New York Knicks: Phil Jackson's 12 Reading Assignments

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4) Amar’e Stoudemire – Give Us King: Samuel, Saul, and David

Give Us a King!: Samuel, Saul, and David by Evertt Fox

Give Us a King!: Samuel, Saul, and David by Evertt Fox

We all know how interested Amar’e is in his Jewish heritage, so a good place for him to start is by reading about someone he might relate to: King Saul.

Saul was the first anointed King of the Israelites. A tall and charismatic man, he quickly led the Israelites into some early victories against their enemies. However soon into Saul’s reign, a rising young soldier named David captivated the people by his astounding success in battle. (Sound familiar?) The people’s praise of David drove Saul into a deep jealousy, so much so that he plotted to kill him.

Despite Saul’s efforts to destroy him, David continued to respect him.  Eventually the rival Philistines made enough gains on the Israelites to close in on them in an epic battle where they would finally overrun them. Defeated and shamed, Saul ultimately fell on his sword while David would go on to become the new King. One of the biblical lessons from this parable is to show that when we become blinded by our strengths we can take our many other gifts for granted, which leads to our downfall.

From the way Amare has gracefully given the Knicks everything asked of him, I think he’s already familiar with this parable.

5) Pablo Prigioni – Unbelievable: Notorious BIG

Unbelievable: The Life, Death, and Afterlife of the Notorious B.I.G. byCheo Hodari Coker

Unbelievable: The Life, Death, and Afterlife of the Notorious B.I.G. byCheo Hodari Coker

I’d like to think that the man fans affectionately call “Priggy Smalls” has no idea why he gets called that. An even bigger part of me would like to see a picture of him on the team plane with his head buried deep into a Biggie book.

6) Tim Hardaway- S*ht My Dad Says

Sh*t My Dad Says

Just like the Dad in this book, Tim Hardaway Sr. is not one to mince words. And just like the son in this book, Tim Hardaway Jr.’s love for his dad is something that’s apparent despite a relationship that was at times fraught with complications.

The language of this book can be a bit vulgar, but from what I remember about Tim Sr.’s trash talk, it probably pales in comparison to that.

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